Sinquefield Cup 2017 is progressing well and taking interesting twists and turns! Here is an analysis video of an epic chess battle between Magnus Carlsen and Maxime Vachier-Lagrave (aka MVL).


The game was equal for most of the part, and yet ultimately Carlsen ended up losing it! Check subtle traps and strategies explained by GM Jan Gustafsson


Interestingly MVL was a second (teammate, helper, practice partner) to Magnus Carlsen!


Here is some food for thought – a sort of puzzle. Below is a photo of score-sheets of game between Peter Svidler and Vishwanathan Anand in Round 2. One is written by Svidler and the other of course is written by Anand.


Can you figure out who has written which one?


You just need to know basics of chess score-sheet and how a game/tournament happens. You can guess the answer based on some close investigation and logical deduction. Of course, you can nail the answer if you know more details about chess notation.


Interestingly, you can also guess the answer if you know Anand’s personality and something about Handwriting Analysis.

OK, so here’s the answer.


The left one is written by Peter Svidler and the right one (neat and clean) is written by Vishy Anand.


Here are three reasons:

  1. When you play a game and write a score-sheet; and when the game ends you sign at the bottom against your side (color). Anand played with black and would have signed on right hand side (in both score-sheets). So having his sign on  right hand side doesn’t say much. However, what says a lot, is the fact that he would have signed first on his own score-sheet and then exchanged with Svidler (that is how it happens in an actual game). So you can see the Anand must have written the score-sheet on right hand side, signed it immediately. (hence his sign is immediately below the last move, and Svidler’s is below, on left hand side). Similarly Svidler would have signed immediately below the last move in left hand side score-sheet and then handed over to Anand who had to sign below Svilder’s.
  2. Svidler (left hand side score-sheet) has used Russian style of old notation. Instead of “c2” he wrote “c2-c4”. Similarly he used K for Knight instead of N that is the standard modern notation. Anand (right hand side score sheet), on the other hand has used the modern notation (he wouldn’t use Russian-style notation)
  3. Third and last argument is more based on handwriting analysis/ psychology and is not a strong reason. Anand is very organized and well articulated and thoughtful person. You would expect his handwriting to be neat and clean and not messy like the one on left hand side. The left hand side writing is all over the place; it’s messy and cluttered. Look at the signature. It signature spreads and spills over way far into the other column. Knowing Anand’s personality, you would not expect this kind of handwriting. Of course this is just a hypothesis. But in this case it holds true!